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osiris

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USP # 6,270,036 (8-7-01) ~ Blown-Air Lift Generating Rotating Airfoil Aircraft
Lowe, Charles S., Jr.


USP # 6,254,032 (7-3-01) ~ Aircraft, &c...
Bucher, Franz


USP # 6,179,247 (1-30-01) ~ Personal Air Transport
Milde, Jr., Karl F.


USP # 6,113,029 (9-5-00) ~ Aircraft Capable of Hovering Flight
Salinas, Luis A.


USP # 6,082,478 (7-4-00) ~ Lift-Augmented Ground Effect Platform
Walter, William. C., et al.


USP # 6,073,881 (6-13-00) ~ Aerodynamic Lift Apparatus
Chen, Chung-ching


USP # 6,068,219 (5-30-00) ~ Single-Surface Multi-Axis Aircraft Control
Arata, Allen A.


USP # 6,053,451 (4-25-00) ~ Remote-Control Flight Vehicle Structure
Yu, Shia-Giow


USP # 6,050,520 (4-18-00) ~ VTOL Aircraft
Kirla, Stanley J.


USP # 6,016,991 (1-25-00) ~ Evacuated Rotating Envelope Aircraft
Lowe, Jr., Charles S.


USP # 5,971,321 (10-26-99) ~ Body-Lift Airplane Assembly
Libengood, Ronald L.


USP # 5,895,011 (4-20-99) ~ Turbine Airfoil Lifting Device
Gubin, Daniel


USP # 5,881,970 (3-16-99) ~ Levity Aircraft Design
Whitesides, Carl W.


USP # 5,836,543 (11-17-98) ~ Discus-Shaped Aerodyne Vehicle...
Kunkel, Klaus


USP # 5,836,542 (11-17-98) ~ Flying Craft &c...
Burns, David J.


USP # 5,803,199 (9-8-98) ~ Lift-Augmented Ground Effect Platform
Walter, William C.


USP # 5,730,391 (3-24-98) ~ Universal Fluid-Dynamic Body for Aircraft & Watercraft
Miller, Jr., John A., et al.


USP # 5,730,390 (3-24-98) ~ Reuseable Spacecraft
Plichta, Peter & Buttner, Walter


USP # 5,653,404 (8-5-97) ~ Disc-Shaped Submersible Aircraft
 Ploskin, Gennady


USP # 5,520,355 (5-28-96) ~ Three-Wing Circular Planform Body
Jones, Jack M.


USP # 5,351,911 (10-4-94) ~ VTOL Flying Disc
Neumayr, George A.


USP # 5,344,100 (9-6-94) ~ Vertical Lift Aircraft
Jaikaran, Allan


USP # 5,318,248 (6-7-94) ~ Vertical Lift Aircraft
 Zielonka, Richard H.


USP # 5,303,879 (4-19-94) ~ Aircraft with a Ducted Fan in a Circular Wing
Bucher, Franz


USP # 5,295,571 (11-9-93) ~ Aircraft with Gyroscopic Stabilization System
Blazquez, Jose M.


USP # 5,213,284 (5-25-93) ~ Disc Planform having Vertical Flight Capability
Webster, Stephen N.


USP # 5,203,521  (4-20-93) ~ Annular Body Aircraft
Day, Terence


USP # 5,178,344 (1-12-93) ~ VTOL Aircraft
Dlouhy, Vaclav


USP # 5,170,963 (12-15-92) ~ VTOL Aircraft
Beck, Jr., August H.


USP # 5,149,012 (9-22-92) ~ Turbocraft
Valverde, Rene L.


USP # 5,115,996 (5-26-92) ~ VTOL Aircraft
Moller, Paul S.


USP # 5,102,066 (4-7-92) ~ VTOL Aircraft
Daniel, William H.


USP # 5,064,143 (11-12-91) ~ Aircraft Having a Pair of Counter Rotating Rotors
Bucher, Franz


USP # 5,054,713 (10-8-91) ~ Circular Airplane
Langley, Lawrence W., et al.


USP # 5,046,685 (9-10-91) ~ Fixed Circular Wing Aircraft
Bose, Phillip R.


USP # 5,039,031 (8-13-91) ~ Turbocraft
Valverde, Rene L.


USP # 4,976,395 (12-11-99) ~ Heavier-Than-Air Disk-Type Aircraft
von Kozierowski, Joachim


USP # 4,955,962 (9-11-99) ~ Remote Control Flying Saucer
Mell, Christian


USP # 4,941,628 (7-19-90) ~ Lift Generating Apparatus, &c.
Sakamoto, Yujiro, et al.


USP # 4,824,048 (4-25-89) ~ Induction Lift Flying Saucer
Kim, Kyusik


USP # 4,804,156 (2-14-89) ~ Circular Aircraft
Harmon, Rodney D.


USP # 4,796,836 (1-10-89) ~ Lifting Engine for VTOL Aircrafts
Buchelt, Benno


USP # 4,795,111 (1-3-89) ~ Robotic or Remotely Controlled Flying Platform
Moller, Paul S.


USP # 4,214,720 (7-29-80) ~ Flying Disc
DeSautel, Edwin R.


USP # 4,196,877 (4-8-80) ~ Aircraft
Mutrux, Jean L.


USP # 4,193,568 (3-18-80) ~ Disc-Type Airborne Vehicle
Heuvel, Norman L.


USP # 4,165,848 (8-28-79) ~ Rotary Thrust Device...
Bizzarri, Alfredo


USP # 4,117,992 (10-3-78) ~ Vertical Lift Device
Vrana, Charles K.


USP # 4,050,652 (9-27-77) ~ Gyro Foil
DeToia, Vincent D.


USP # 4,023,751 (5-17-77) ~ Flying Ship
Richard, Walter A.


USP # 4,014,483 (3-29-77) ~ Lighter-Than-Air Craft
MacNeil, Roderick M.


USP # 3,933,325 (1-20-76) ~ Disc-Shaped Aerospacecraft
Kaelin, Joseph R.


USP # 3,871,602 (3-18-75) ~ Circular Wing Aircraft
Kissinger, Curtis D.


USP # 3,774,865 (11-27-73) ~ Flying Saucer
Pinto, Olympio F.


USP # 3,750,980 (8-7-73) ~ Aircraft with VTOL Capability
Edwards, Samuel L.


USP # 3,697,020 (10-10-72) ~ Vertical Lift Machine
Thompson, Raymond V.


USP # 3,690,597 (9-12-72) ~ VTOL Aircraft...
Di Martino, Renato


USP # 3,640,489 (2-8-72) ~ VTOL Aircraft
Jaeger, Karl


USP # 3,630,470 (12-28-71) ~ VTOL Vehicle
Elliot, Frederick T.


USP # 3,614,030 (10-19-71) ~ Aircraft
Moller, Paul S.


USP # 3,612,445 (10-12-71) ~ Lift Actuator Disc
Phillips, Duan A.


USP # 3,599,902 (8-17-71) ~ Aircraft
Thomley, John W.


USP # 3,537,669 (11-3-70) ~ Manned Disc-Shaped Flying Craft
Modesti, James N.


USP # 3,503,573 (3-31-70) ~ Disk Flying Craft
Modesti, James N.


USP # 3,469,802 (9-30-69) ~ Transport
Roberts, J. R., et al.


USP # 3,437,290 (4-8-69) ~ Vertical Lift Aircraft
Norman, Francis A.


USP # 3,432,120 (4-11-69) ~ Aircraft
Guerrero, E.


USP # 3,410,507 (11-12-68) ~ Aircraft
Moller, Paul S.


USP # 3,397,853 (8-20-68) ~ Fluid-Sustained Vehicle
Richardson, William. B.


USP # 3,395,876 (8-6-68) ~ Aircraft with Housed Counter-Rotating Propellors
Green, Jacob B.


USP # 3,387,801 (6-11-68) ~ VTOL Aircraft
Kelsey, C. W.


USP # 3,321,156 (5-23-67) ~ Universally Manuverable Aircraft
McMasters, Douglas Q.


USP # 3,312,425 (4-4-67) ~ Aircraft
Lennon, C. D., et al.


USP # 3,243,146 (3-29-66) ~ VTOL Aircraft
Clover, P. B.


USP # 3,237,888 (3-1-66) ~ Aircraft
Willis, William M.


USP # 3,199,809 (8-10-65) ~ Circular Wing Flying Craft
Modesti, James N.


USP # 3,182,929 (5-11-65) ~ VTOL Aircraft
Lemberger, Robert A.


USP # 3,124,323 (3-10-64) ~ Aircraft Propulsion & Control
Frost, John C. M.


USP # 3,123,320 (4-3-64) ~ Vertical Rise Aircraft
Slaughter, E. E.


USP # 3,073,551 (1-15-63) ~ Vertical Lift Aircraft
Bowersox, Joseph W.


USP # 3,072,366 (1-8-63) ~ Fluid-Sustained Aircraft
Freeland, Leonor Z.


USP # 3,067,967 (12-11-62) ~ Flying Machine
Barr, I. R.


USP # 3,066,890 (12-4-62) ~ Supersonic Aircraft
Price, Nathan C.


USP # 3,065,935 (11-27-62) ~ VTOL Aircraft
Dubbury, J., et al.


USP # 3,051,417 (8-28-62) ~ Aircraft Control Systems
Frost, John C. M., et al.

USP # 3,051,415 (8-28-62) ~ Fluid-Sustained Aircraft
Frost, John C. M.

USP # 3,051,414 (8-28-62) ~ Aircraft with Jet Fluid Control Ring
Frost, John C. M.


USP # 3,024,966 (3-13-62) ~ Radial Flow Gas Turbine Engine Rotor Bearing
Frost, John C. M.


USP # 3,022,963 (2-27-62) ~ Disc-type Aircraft...
Frost. John C. M., et al.


USP # 3,020,003 (2-6-62) ~ Disc Aircraft...
Frost, John C. M., et al.

USP # 3,018,068 (1-23-62) ~ Disc Aircraft...
Frost, John C. M., et al.


USP # 3,020,002 (2-6-62) ~ VTOL Control
Frost, John C. M.


USP # 2,997,254 (8-22-61)~ Gyro-Stabilized Vertical Rising Vehicle (Discoid)
Mulgrave, Thomas P., et al.


USP # 2,988,303 (6-13-61) ~ Jet-Sustained Aircraft
Coanda, Henri


USP # 2,953,320 (9-20-60) ~ Aircraft with Ducted Lifting Fan
Parry, Robert D.


USP # 2,944,762 (7-12-60) ~ Aircraft
Lane, Thomas R.


USP # 2,939,648 (6-7-60) ~ Rotating Jet Aircraft with Lifting Disc Wing...
Fleissner, H.


USP # 2,937,492 (5-24-60) ~ Rotary Reaction Engine
Lehberger, Arthur N.


USP # 2,935,275 (5-3-60) ~ Disc-Shaped Aircraft
Grayson, Leonard W.


USP # 2,927,746 (3-8-60) ~ Toroidal Aircraft
Mellen, Walter R.


USP # 2,918,230 (12-22-59) ~ Fluid-Sustained & Fluid-Propelled Aircraft
Lippisch, Alexander M.


USP # 2,876,965 (3-10-59) ~ Circular Wing Aircraft...
Streib, Homer F.


USP # 2,863,621 (12-9-58) ~ Vertical & Horizontal Flight Aircraft
Davis, John W.


USP # 2,801,058 (7-30-57) ~ Saucer-Shaped Aircraft
Lent, Constantin P.


USP # 2,777,649 (1-15-57) ~ Fluid-Sustained Aircraft
Williams, Samuel B.


USP # 2,772,057 (11-27-56) ~ Circular Aircraft &c..
Fischer, John C.


USP # 2,736,514 (2-28-56) ~ Convertible Aircraft
Ross, Robert S.


USP # 2,730,311 (1-10-56) ~ Impeller Propelled Aerodynamic Body
Doak, Edmond R.


USP # 2,718,364 (9-20-55) ~ Fluid-Sustained & Propelled Aircraft...
Crabtree, E.L.


USP # 2,619,302 (11-25-52) ~ Low Aspect Ratio Aircraft
Loedding, Alfred C.


USP # 2,567,392 (9-11-51) ~ Fluid-Sustained Aircraft
Naught, Harold


USP # 2,431,293 (11-18-47) ~ Airplane of Low Aspect Ratio
Zimmermann, Charles H.


USP # 2,377,835 (6-5-45) ~ Discopter
Weygers, Alexander G.


USP # 1,887,411 (11-8-32) ~ Aircraft Construction
Johnson, R. B.




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Reply with quote  #2 

wow - this is fascinating, where did you get these from?

osiris

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fifitrix

wow - this is fascinating, where did you get these from?



Google disk aircraft.
Kasey

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Reply with quote  #4 

Sorry ive deleted my reply to this thread , i was wrong to say what i did , i was cranky from lack of sleep


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osiris

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Reply with quote  #5 
This One!

USP # 5,115,996 (5-26-92) ~ VTOL Aircraft
Moller, Paul S.


Paul Moller's latest design, the Skycar M400, is designed to take off and land vertically, like a Harrier Jet, in small spaces. It can reach speeds of 400 mph (644 kph), but will cruise at around 350 mph (563 kph), and it has a range of 900 miles (1449 km). Gasoline, diesel, alcohol, kerosene and propane can be used to fuel the Skycar, and its fuel mileage will be comparable to that of a medium-sized car, getting 20 miles (32.2 km) to the gallon. The initial cost of a Skycar will be about $1 million, but once it begins to be mass produced that price could come down to as low as $60,000.

travel.howstuffworks.com/flying-car2.htm



Photo courtesy Moller International
The Skycar will be operated completely by computer and guided by GPS satellites.
The four-seat Skycar is powered by eight roterary engines that are housed inside four metal housings, called nacelles, on the side of the vehicle. There are two engines in each nacelle so that if one of the engines in one of the nacelle fails, the other engine can sustain flight. The engines lift the craft with 720 horsepower, and then thrust the craft forward. The Wankel engine replaces pistons of a conventional engine with a single triangular rotor spinning inside an oval-shaped chamber, which creates compression and expansion as the rotor turns. There are three combustion chambers in the Wankel, with a crankshaft between them.

To make the Skycar safe and available to the general public, it will be completely controlled by computers using GPS satellites, which Moller calls a fly-by-wire system. In case of an accident, the vehicle will release a parachute and airbags, internally and externally, to cushion the impact of the crash.

MACRO Industries' SkyRider X2R will also use this fly-by-wire system to safely transport passengers to their desired destinations. Drivers will simply get in, turn on the power and enter the address or phone number of their destination. SkyRider will do the rest. MACRO said that the system will be almost fully automatic, but may allow some manual control. Commands will be entered just by telling the car what you want it to do.

According to their Web site, MACRO is shooting to have a working vehicle produced sometime in 2006. The company is planning to power the vehicle with an enhanced automobile engine to drive four-ducted fans. The unique feature of the SkyRider will be the company's patented rotary cartridge valve, which is expected to increase fuel efficiency and reduce emissions.

The CityHawk is similar to the Skycar and SkyRider in that it also takes off and lands vertically. However, there are some key differences. The CityHawk will be powered by fans that are driven by four internal combustian engines. Much like in the Skycar, this redundancy of engines will allow the vehicle to land even if one of the engines is lost. The CityHawk is about the size of a Chevy Surburban, and will have cruising speeds of 90 to 100 miles per hour (145 to 161 kph). CityHawk developers say that it could be used as an air taxi, for news gathering and for traffic control.

The mass availability of flying cars could be very exciting or very scary, depending on how you look at it. If proper safeguards are put in place, they could be the answer to our ever-worsening traffic jams. Flying cars that can travel at hundreds of miles per hour would not only cut that rush hour commute to a few minutes, but it would allow us to live hundreds of miles farther from work and still make it to the office faster than by road-bound cars today.
                                                                                                                                                __________________


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