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ali

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Dudettes/Dudes
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Reply with quote  #11 
Gardener - If they don't put in an effort to fight the most of the fires what so you think would happen?  This isn't the old days when we would have one or two fires a year.  
There was a "let it burn" policy in the '70's that resulted in a devastating fire in Yellowstone in 1988.  
Sometimes these fires were okay but - not anymore.  There's too much drought.


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Gardener

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Reply with quote  #12 
I wasn't suggesting to let it burn I was just pointing out that before humans started their logging and industrial practices fires would not get this out of hand. On some Native American reservations the forests are untouched. A good example is the Umatilla reservation on the blue mountain range. There's old growth forest with large trees and you can observe the balance. The trees are not too close together so when a fire starts the dry grasses burn without creating a worse situation. Many organizations go out and replant trees but they never go back 15 to 20 years later to thin the trees so when a fire starts there's more fuel to cause the fire to burn hotter. In Washington State on the west side there used to be a population of Sequoia giant trees that were thousands of years old. They survived countless fires before there was a such thing as a firefighter. In the Umatilla forest example there's Douglas fir trees that are hundreds of years old. In the areas that were logged Grand fir, spruce, and Western Larch trees have taken over planted too close together and never thinned causing a potential fire hazard except on parts of the reservation where the forest remains untouched. The bark of a Douglas fir is fire resistant unless it is surrounded by dead trees and branches fallen off. Natural forest trees are spaced properly so on a drought year it doesn't cause them to dry out, become weak and susceptible to diseases. I have only been to Montana one time delivery watermelons to Libby and Missoula but I imagine the same logging practices are contributing to forest fires getting out of hand. In a natural situation forest fires are part of the process. The United States has only been around since 1776 or started being settled since 1492 and just about every clear stream or river has been contaminated to toxic levels. We have not been good stewards to the landscape and we are suffering the consequences. It seems like a tragedy to lose our things and homes to natural disasters but they are just things. We can learn from it or be destined to make the same mistakes. A life worth living is always tough, full of loss, suffering, and at the end of it the stories worth telling give us hope and meaning. Hopefully it will rain and restore hope.
ali

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Dudettes/Dudes
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Reply with quote  #13 
I agree with most everything you say.  Very interesting post.

We just a rainstorm here about a week ago.  Didn't do a damn thing but start more fires with the abundant lightening it showered down upon us.

The only thing to stop these fires is snow.  Oh how I hate that thought.  Snow.  But we could use a good blizzard right about now.



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And God said "let there be light".
Then General Electric pushed him out of the way and the era of Corporate America was born to rule the universe.
Gardener

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Reply with quote  #14 
Rain is finally on the way clouds should start moving in Sunday hopefully it will help with the fires here out West so people can get back to their lives.
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